Vintage Heinkel Cabin Cruiser 'Bubble Car' Sells for £6,300 After 52 Years of Storage

A blue Heinkel Cabin Cruiser, a vintage 'bubble car,' which last underwent an MOT (Ministry of Transport test) in January 1971, was purchased at an Anglia car auction in King's Lynn, Norfolk, on Sunday.

The bubble car was sold for £6,300 despite having been off the road for 52 years.

The compact vehicle accommodates only two people, with its steering wheel attached to the front door. It has covered a mere 21,098 miles since its manufacture in 1959.

This three-wheeled automobile is equipped with a 197cc petrol engine and comes with Ministry of Transport certificates from 1969 and 1970, tax discs, and a letter from the DVLC (Driver and Vehicle Licensing Centre) dating back to 1984, confirming the entitlement for the original registration number - 264 KPL.

Another bubble car, an Italian Isetta 300, was sold for £4,700. Since its production in 1960, it had traveled 28,117 miles, with its last MOT due in October 1983.

According to the seller, as per the Anglia Auctions website, the 295cc engine was in working condition.

The only documentation accompanying the Isetta was an old V5 registration document, indicating it had two owners since 1978, and a Ministry of Transport certificate.

Bubble cars earned their nickname due to their round shape and numerous windows, making passengers look as though they were inside a bubble.

Some of these vehicles are only slightly longer than a bicycle, and perhaps that's why people can drive them with just a motorcycle license. Their small size, however, makes them easy to park and remarkably maneuverable.

The steering wheel and dashboard are attached to the front door, which swings outward for easy entry. Unlike more modern three-wheelers, bubble cars often have two wheels at the front and one at the rear.

Last year, a bubble car restored by the late Sir Stirling Moss was put up for sale. The legendary Formula 1 racer taught his 42-year-old son, Elliot, to drive in a 1957 BMW Isetta 600, which he had rebuilt in the 1990s.

Sir Stirling, who passed away three years ago at the age of 90, was often seen navigating the streets of London in a tiny microcar.

Bubble cars earned their nickname due to their round shape and numerous windows, making passengers look as though they were inside a bubble.